5 Documents You Need in Your Singapore PR Application

Did you know that the outcome of your Singapore PR approval can hinge on just one document? The Immigration & Checkpoints Authority handles thousands of applications annually that even missing out a single document can lead to an incomplete submission. As a consequence, your application may be met with non-acceptance during the submission process.

On top of this, you only have a limited time of up to seven days or 168 hours from the moment you begin your online application. Hence, it is highly recommended for you to ensure that you organise all of your necessary documents before proceeding.

One great way to do this is to compile a checklist — here are five different types of documents needed in a Singapore PR application for you to begin with.

 

PR Document #1: Digital Passport-Sized Photograph

Every Singapore PR hopeful is required to supplement their online application with their own digital passport-sized colour photograph of themselves. As the applicant, the onus is entirely on you to ensure that your photograph is deemed acceptable by the Immigration & Checkpoints Authority. These include aspects related to its size, finish (if it was originally printed), camera quality as well as the image’s composition of the background and subject:

1. Size

A photograph is considered passport-sized if it is 35mm wide by 45mm high without a border around its content. Additionally, when scanned and uploaded to the e-PR system as a digital image file, it must be sized 400 by 514 pixels, no larger than 1MB and in either JPG or JPEG format.

2. Photograph Finish

If your photograph was not originally taken digitally, ensure that its finish is matt or semi-matt. This is to ensure that its subject, your face, is not marred by any distracting shine or shadow when the photograph is scanned and uploaded. Alternatively, a digital camera can eliminate the need to fret over the finish of the photograph altogether.

3. Quality of Camera

When taking your own photograph, ensure that your choice of digital camera has a resolution of at least 2.0 megapixels. For beginners, the term ‘resolution’ in digital photography refers to the pixel density or count of the picture. Hence, in general, the higher the pixel count or density of a photograph, the higher its quality when taken correctly. Therefore, a digital camera with a resolution of 2.0 megapixels would result in a photograph of suitable quality to be printed onto your future NRIC. Beginners are highly recommended to use a camera with an automatic mode, featuring automatic settings for exposure, focus, and white balance. Cameras that feature a macro or close-up setting can also be very useful for sharpening the focus on yourself.

4. Background

The photograph must have a white background. This may be set up using a plain white drop screen, similar to those used in photography studios or simply a plain white wall in your home. No distracting marks should be visible in the background.

5. Subject

Finally, position the subject, yourself, such that you are in the middle of the frame, front-facing with your face and open eyes in full view. An easy way to ensure that you are correctly positioned is to place the camera at your eye level, about 0.5 to 2 metres from yourself. However, this distance can differ, depending on the focal length of your camera. Regardless, your features, from the chin to crown, should fit within 25 mm and 35 mm of the picture. Additionally, your face should not be obstructed by either facial or head accessories. You are only allowed to wear headgear if you are required to do so out of religious or racial custom. However, you should continue to wear your glasses if you usually wear them. The lighting should be such that no shadows take the focus away from you as the main subject. If you are using a camera flash, direct it slightly off the face to avoid any “red-eye”. Finally, no editing of your facial features, such as the removal of tattoos, moles, or birthmarks should occur.

 

PR Document #2: Valid Travel Documents and Passes

All applicants and sponsors should upload copies of their valid travel documents, including your current passport, and valid immigration passes. Only upload pages from your passport that display your personal particulars, such as your name and passport number, and any other official description — this is usually the biodata page. Additionally, the passport has to be valid for at least 6 months from the date of entry. If any of these are not in English, supplement your application with their notarised translations. You must also ensure that the digital copy of these documents are under 2MB when uploading these files to the e-PR system.

A valid immigration pass refers to one of the following:

1. Employment Pass

The Employment Pass (EP) is held by foreign professionals, executives, and managers who are based in Singapore. Issued by the Ministry of Manpower, the EP is granted only to qualified candidates who earn a monthly salary of at least $3600. PR applicants with the EP usually fall under the Professionals, Technical Personnel and Skilled Workers (PTS) scheme.

2. S Pass

The S Pass is held by mid-level skilled workers who are based in Singapore. Issued by the Ministry of Manpower, this is granted to qualified candidates who possess the relevant work experience and earn a monthly salary of at least $2300. PR applicants with this pass fall under the Professionals, Technical Personnel and Skilled Workers (PTS) scheme.

3. Entrepreneur Pass

Issued by the Ministry of Manpower, the Entrepreneur Pass (EntrePass) is held by foreign investors who have set up and is currently operating an approved new private limited company, based in Singapore.

4. Personalised Employment Pass

The Personalised Employment Pass (PEP) is held by EP holders with a high monthly income. Issued by the Ministry of Manpower, the PEP is similar to the EP, but with greater flexibility and is not tied to any employer.

5. Long Term Visit Pass (LTVP)

The LTVP is held by visitors who have been residing in Singapore for an extended duration of not more than 2 years. PR applicants who are LTVP holders are usually the spouse or child of a Singapore PR or Citizen, the parent of a Citizen as well as a recent graduate from an Institute of Higher Learning who are seeking employment in Singapore.

6. Short Term Visit Pass (STVP)

The STVP is typically held by visitors who are in Singapore for a very limited duration. It may also be held by those who wish to stay here while waiting for the relevant authorities to grant them an approval to hold another pass.

7. Dependant’s Pass

The Dependant’s Pass is held by the spouse and children of S Pass or EP holders who wish to reside in Singapore with the latter.

8. Student’s Pass

The Student’s Pass is held by full-time international students with an acceptance letter from a local educational institute.

 

PR Document #3: Identification and Profile

All PR hopefuls and sponsors are to furnish their applications with the relevant identification documents, including the following:

  • Identity card (if applicable)
  • Deed poll/Change of name certificate (if applicable)
  • Birth certificate or;
  • Family census or;
  • Family register

This allows the ICA to identify the applicant as well as build a profile of their family, especially those who have family ties to Singaporeans. If any of these are not in English, supplement your application with their notarised translations. You must also ensure that the digital copy of these documents are under 2MB when uploading these files to the e-PR system.

1. Identity Card

Applicants from countries that gives its citizens identity cards must upload copies of the front and back of the card. However, this is not necessary for those who are from countries that do not require its citizens to apply for an identity card. On the other hand, Singapore Citizens (SC) and PRs have to upload this document since they do hold one.

2. Deed Poll or Change of name certificate

PR applicants or sponsors who have changed their names and hold documents that display a different name from their current one are obliged to upload a copy of their deed poll or change of name certificate. However, for aged parents who do not have either of these, a letter from a competent figure of authority, such as a Chairman of Communes or Village Headman, that certifies the relationship between the sponsor and the parent is acceptable.

3. Birth Certificate/Official Household Census List/Family Register

All applicants and sponsors must upload copies of their birth certificate or official household census or their family register that states both their parents’ names. However, for aged parents who do not possess any of these, a letter from a competent figure of authority (such as a Chairman of Communes or Village Headman) that certifies the relationship between the sponsor and the parent is acceptable. Additionally, the letter must state the names and current whereabouts of the applicant’s children and spouse.

 

PR Document #4: Highest Education Certificates

Not every PR applicant has to provide the ICA with their highest education certificates. Thus far, only the following applicants must upload their relevant education certificate:

  • Spouse of current SPR or SC
  • Children of current SPR or SC
  • Employment Pass and S Pass holders under the PTS scheme
  • International Student
  • Foreign Investors under the Global Investor Programme (GIP) scheme

If any of these are not in English, supplement your application with their notarised translations. You must also ensure that the digital copy of these documents is under 2MB when uploading these files to the e-PR system.

1. All Tertiary Level Educational Certificates

All applicants stated above are required to upload copies of all their tertiary level educational certificates. This refers to any education above secondary school, high school, or the equivalent. Aged parents do not have to provide this.

2. All Tertiary Level Educational Transcripts

All applicants stated above are required to upload copies of all their tertiary level educational transcripts. This refers to any education above secondary school, high school, or the equivalent. Aged parents do not have to provide this.

3. Professional License, Membership or Vocational Trade Certificates

Where applicable, students and all PR applicants under the PTS and GIP schemes must upload copies of any professional licenses, membership certificates or vocational trade certificates that have been awarded to them. This will help the ICA assess whether you possess any skills that are in demand in local industries. Spouses and children of current PRs and SCs, as well as aged parents of current SCs, do not have to provide this.

 

PR Document #5: Employment Paperwork

Finally, applicants and sponsors who are gainfully employed must provide documents that state their current employment status. Only international students who are applying for Singapore PR do not have to provide these documents. If any of these are not in English, supplement your application with their notarised translations. You must also ensure that the digital copy of these documents are under 2MB when uploading these files to the e-PR system.

Firstly, all applicants who fall under the PTS scheme may include any testimonials that you may have received from previous employers. For those who are self-employed, you must provide your Valid Business Registration Certificate that also includes the names of your partners as well as occupational license.

On the other hand, if you are attached to an employer, you must provide copies of your payslips for the last six months. To allow the ICA to verify this, all applicants must include consent forms from the Inland Revenue Authority of Singapore (IRAS). Sponsors are also required to include consent forms from the Central Provident Fund (CPF) board. Finally, you are to furnish their application with their employer’s letter, dated within a month of the application, stating:

  • Current position held
  • Date of employment
  • Detailed breakdown of payslip

For your reference, the detailed breakdown of the payslip must include:

1. Basic Salary

Basic salary refers to your salary without additional compensation from overtime, bonus or commission. It should not include any allowance given to you for the purposes of travel, food or housing. This should not count any contributions made by your contractor or employer to your pension or provident fund, or payment to settle special expenses due to the hazardous, unusual, or special nature of your current employment. Any amount that is paid to you upon your retirement or discharge is also excluded from your basic salary.

2. Overtime

Overtime work refers to all work hours that exceed your normal working hours and breaks.

3. Allowance

Allowance refers to any additional payment from your company purely for the purposes of travel, housing, or food. This is completely separate from your basic salary.

 

The Takeaway

Worry not if you feel taken aback by the sheer amount of paperwork required for your Singapore PR application. Our highly trained specialists at Paul Immigrations are more than capable of lending you a helping hand with this tedious process. Contact us for a personalised consultation and we can take all this off your hands for a smoother PR application experience.